Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADS-B) is helping Mongolian air traffic ahead of the delivery of a new traffic control center.

Mongolian airspace

The amount of air traffic using Mongolian airspace has been growing steadily. In 2017, the number of overflights increased 11.6% compared with 2016.

A new traffic control center will make a significant difference to the safety and efficiency of flights when it is commissioned in 2020. In the meantime, however, the use of ADS-B to reduce separation between aircraft in non-radar airspace will bring huge benefits.

ADS-B will improve flight safety and reduce the hardware-related delay in surveillance control services. 

The implementation of ADS-B within the non-radar airspace for providing reduced ATS surveillance control separation between aircraft is a very significant development and welcomed by the airline industry

About 97% of aircraft flying through Mongolian airspace are already equipped with the appropriate equipment. By 2021, Mongolia requires all aircraft operating in its upper airspace to have ADS-B equipment.

“The implementation of ADS-B within the non-radar airspace for providing reduced ATS surveillance control separation between aircraft is a very significant development and welcomed by the airline industry,” said Honghai Yang, IATA’s Regional Director for Safety and Flight Operations, North Asia. 

“Given the massive growth of air traffic in the region, especially the demand for air travel to and from China, the changes will enhance the airspace capacity to accommodate more flights, while maintaining safe aircraft operations. 

“We look forward to continuing to support and work with the CAA of Mongolia to implement other initiatives to increase the safety and efficiency of the airspace.” 

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