Mexico City’s new airport is on schedule to open in 2020

The existing facility is already struggling to cope with the growth in air traffic—meaning the new airport is desperately needed to serve a city boasting 20 million inhabitants, and a place in the world’s top 20 cities list by GDP.

A collaboration between Foster + Partners, FR-EE and NACO, at 470 000 m2 the new airport will be one of the world’s largest.

The airport is planned to open with three runways capable of handling some 60 million passengers per annum 

Its design anticipates the predicted increase in passenger numbers and, according to Foster + Partners, its development will be the catalyst for the regeneration of the area surrounding its location in Zona Federal del Lago de Texcoco.

The airport is planned to open with three runways capable of handling some 60 million passengers per annum (mppa).

It will be expanded in phases to an eventual six runways and 120 mppa capacity.

Aeromexico Chief Executive Officer, Andres Conesa, says the airline has been working with the authorities since the project’s inception in 2014. “They have been open to what we are saying, and they have listened,” he says. “As an airline, we are the ones that will be using the facilities so it is right that we have input.

“We appreciate that building an airport is not easy,” he continues.

It will be much better for our consumers. We will finally have a world-class airport

“But I understand the project is on time and we are expecting it to be ready at the end of the second quarter, 2020.

“The new airport shares the same airspace as the current airport so it will be a case of closing one and turning the switch to open the other. So, we need to be very prepared for that transition.

“Once the new airport opens, it will be much better for our consumers. We will finally have a world-class airport.”

Environmental considerations are an important element in the design of the new airport.

Foster + Partners say the entire building will be serviced from beneath, freeing the roof of ducts and pipes and leaving it to harness the power of the sun, collect rainwater, provide shading, and enable views—all while achieving a high-performance envelope that meets thermal and acoustic standards.

The LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Platinum design works with Mexico City’s temperate, dry climate to fill the terminal spaces with fresh air using displacement ventilation principles.

For a large part of the year, comfortable temperatures will be maintained by almost 100% outside air, with little or no additional heating or cooling required. 

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