Rising number of passengers will put greater pressure on an air transport system that already faces significant capacity challenges.

Alexandre de Juniac

By Patrick Appleton

Air traffic management (ATM) must move faster to reform and modernize in time to meet growing demand, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) has said.

Speaking at the Civil Air Navigation Services Organization (CANSO) summit in Geneva, IATA Director General and CEO Alexandre de Juniac said that although air navigation service providers (ANSPs) are doing important work in keeping people safe, more can be done in terms of efficiency.

“We need ANSPs to be more customer-focused, financially autonomous, and performance driven,” said de Juniac. “That can only be achieved through partnership and collaboration towards a cost-effective ATM transformation.”

Without planes, there would not be much for ANSPs to do. And without ANSPs, our planes would not go very far, so we need to work together

Figures from IATA’s AGM in June suggest that by 2037, 8.2 billion passengers will travel by air, which will put greater pressure on an air transport system that already faces significant capacity challenges.

De Juniac called for greater co-operation between ANSPs and IATA members to create an improved air transport industry.

“We are partners in this business,” he said. “Without planes, there would not be much for ANSPs to do. And without ANSPs, our planes would not go very far, so we need to work together.”

The IATA chief said that although ANSPs and airlines work well together currently, the organization’s members want to see greater collaboration and openness.

In his speech, de Juniac also covered the need for “efficient, reliable and cost effective” ATM and pointed out that Europe was at a “crisis point” in dealing with delays effectively.

He added that ATM has the opportunity to help with environmental issues by providing more efficient routes and said future issues surrounding capacity continues to cause concern.

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