The 25by2025 campaign sees participating airlines making a voluntary commitment to advance gender diversity in the airline industry.

Jane Hoskisson

By Patrick Appleton

Almost 60 airlines have committed to the 25by2025 campaign aimed at addressing gender balance in aviation.

The news was announced at the International Air Transport Association (IATA) Global Media Days in Geneva on December 11-12.

Launched in September, the IATA campaign sees participating airlines making a voluntary commitment to advance gender diversity in the airline industry over the next six years.

We have a lot of men supporting the program who see the need to have a variety of opinions and skills at senior levels, which women can bring to the table

To achieve this, airlines will aim to increase the number of women in senior roles and under-represented jobs by either 25% against the current metrics, or to a minimum representation of 25% by 2025, as well as reporting annually on key diversity metrics.

“This campaign will enable airlines to share best practices and knowledge on what can be done to bridge that gap,” said Jane Hoskisson, IATA’s Director, Learning and Development.

“It is about providing the right skillset to equip women to advance their careers, climb up the ladder and to break this invisible ceiling.

“We have a lot of men supporting the program who see the need to have a variety of opinions and skills at senior levels, which women can bring to the table.”

China Eastern, Qatar Airways and Lufthansa Group were among the first airlines to join the 25by2025 campaign in September. 

Since then, 29 airlines committed to the initiative at Wings of Change Europe in November, and in Geneva last week it was announced that to date, 59 airlines have made a pledge to drive the campaign within their own organizations.

On the IATA side, Hoskisson said the trade association for the world’s airlines would continue to work on increasing the number of women speaking at IATA’s global events.

However, with fewer women holding senior airline roles at present, increasing female representation within IATA’s governance structure will be a more difficult challenge, she acknowledged.

The next phase of the 25by2025 campaign will focus on collecting data across the key areas of focus, including measuring and reporting on the number of women in senior positions and the number of women represented in industry-level meetings.

Those findings will be shared at IATA’s AGM and Air Transport Summit in June 2020.

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