Passengers in Britain warned of the risks involved in consuming too much alcohol at airports and onboard flights.

One Too Many

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) has joined forces with the travel industry in the UK to launch a summer campaign aimed at raising awareness of flying responsibly.

The 'One Too Many' campaign – backed by Aviation Minister Baroness Sugg – sees IATA , Airlines UK, the Airports Operators Association (AOA) and the UK Travel Retail Forum (UKTRF) working together to address the issue of passengers drinking to excess when on flights.

Launching the initiative, UKTRF Chair Francois Bourienne reiterated that it is an offence to be drunk on an airplane. Such passenger disturbances can be costly, with heavy fines, prison sentences, airline bans and diversion fees of up to £80,000 some of the risks.

IATA is proud to partner with UKTRF, AOA and Airlines UK on this campaign to remind passengers to fly responsibly. The party should be at the destination, not on the plane

"The One Too Many campaign is to remind people of the consequences of irresponsible drinking at any stage of their journey and to highlight the fact that, while serious disruptive behaviour remains rare, it can be costly and cause delays," she said.

The campaign is being rolled out via Facebook, Instagram and across ten pilot airports in the UK, including Manchester, Birmingham and Gatwick, where it can be seen across digital screen signage, POS display, F&B retailer notices and through a dedicated police leaflet.

Backing the campaign, IATA's Regional Vice President for Europe, Rafael Schvartzman said that although incidents are "relatively rare" it remains a top concern for cabin crew.

"Any incident is one too many. Airlines have a zero-tolerance approach to unruly behaviour and cabin crew and passengers have a right to a flight free from disturbance and harassment," he said.

"We are proud to partner with UKTRF, AOA and Airlines UK on this campaign to remind passengers to fly responsibly. The party should be at the destination, not on the plane."

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